The Dasgupta group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan performs research at the intersection of nanotechnology, energy science, and manufacturing.  Our goal is to develop scalable, low-cost techniques for the synthesis and assembly of nanostructures to address complex energy-related environmental challenges.  Example applications include solar photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, catalysts, and batteries.  We are affiliated with the University of Michigan Energy Institute.

Our research is highly interdisciplinary, drawing from influences in mechanical engineering, materials science, electrical engineering, physics and chemistry.  We use a variety of tools for top-down and bottom-up materials synthesis, including atomic layer deposition (ALD), vapor-phase and solution-based nanowire growth, self-assembly, and the cleanroom facilities in the Lurie Nanofabrication Facility (LNF) at UM.  We also utilize a wide range of nanocharacterization tools, including scanning probe microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy, optical and x-ray spectroscopy, and chemical analysis techniques to probe the structure and composition of our materials, many of which are a part of the Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory (EMAL).